Albannach Renaissance

| Leave a comment

This is another cocktail based on Scotch single malt whisky. Scotch blended whisky isn’t classic cocktail component because of many reasons. Single malt whisky has much more reasons not to be widely used in cocktails. It remains as exotic tool for innovative bartenders and mixologists, something like bitters. I’ve learnt about  Albannach Renaissance at Gin, Not Vodka. The cocktail based on combination of peaty Scotch whisky and Italian aperitif Aperol. As I understand, the  title for the cocktail has been taken from the name of the restaurant where the author Vytautas Jurkus works. At first I was in a hurry and flippantly substituted Campari for Aperol and Bowmore Legend for Ardbeg Renaissance. I don’t think that my first Albannach Renaissance cocktail was good. But it was the thing which I remembered as something special and exotic. Here is the original recipe.

Albannach Renaissance
  • 37.5mL Ardbeg Renaissance
  • 12.5mL Aperol
  • 25mL lemon juice
  • 12.5mL gomme syrup
  • dash orange bitters
  • dash egg white
  • orange zest

Shake with ice and strain into an iced rocks glass. Garnish with the orange zest.

I’ve turned to the cocktail when I bought a bottle of Talisker 10yo whisky. I found interesting combination of peaty whisky, sour lemon juice and wonderful Aperol flavour. My first move was to bring some true Islay aroma to average Bowmore Legend whisky. For this, I added a small dose of Laphroaig 10yo whisky. I thought that Bowmore can give nice and thick peaty base and Laphroaig would work as flavouring agent creating fine hint of smoky peat. Also I decided to increase Aperol amount to turn lemon acidity to tart side.

Albannach Renaissance (Ìle, Banrìgh nan Eilean adaptation)

  • 35 ml Bowmore Legend,
  • 5 ml Laphroaig 10yo,
  • 20 ml Aperol,
  • 20 ml fresh lemon juice,
  • 5 ml rock candy syrup,
  • 1 dash Angostura orange bitters,
  • 1-2 tsp egg white.

Shake vigorously with ice, double strain into cocktail glass. Orange twist as a garnish.

Albannach Renaissance

Unusual things start from here. The first, appearance: cheerful pink with gentle foam. A quite logical but I was surprised though. The second, very strong nose of citrus and smoke on a quite bitter floral background. The taste starts with smooth sour ant tart note of peat, wood and lemon zest. Egg white and sugar syrup bring nice silk texture, so acidity and tartness gain some mildness from it. On the swallow I found citrus, peat, leather, orange candies and herbal tea. The aroma isn’t soft and a bit aggressive but on the other hand it’s full of harmony. Then aftertaste came with tart lemon pie, spicy cloves, cardamom and light hints of burning leaves and orange zest. Interesting cocktail, very bright, with delightful freshness, depth and minimal sweetness. My second effort was with Talisker.

Albannach Renaissance (An t-Eilean Sgitheanach adaptation)

  • 40 ml Talisker 10yo,
  • 20 ml Aperol,
  • 20 ml fresh lemon juice,
  • 5 ml rock candy syrup,
  • 1 dash Angostura orange bitters,
  • 1-2 tsp egg white.

Shake vigorously with ice, double strain into cocktail glass. Orange twist as a garnish.

The nose is on the whisky side with peat, iodine and salty notes. Behind all, lemon zest is also there. The sip is similar but softer and sweeter. Talisker brought some fruit sweetness which made the taste deeper. On the palate orange notes successfully competed with peat and wood combining in fresh and dry flavour. The fist aftertaste was completely lemony but later it got some peat, wood and leather notes. In the finish soft lemon tone combined with light smoky hint. Well, two my Albannach Renaissance adaptations showed good results. Nice aperitifs, all they were strong, powerful and not sweet. All components add their features according to their proportions so the final flavour was on the dry and sour side. The balance between whisky/Aperol and lemon juice is a quite unsteady, and that turns to advantage when lemon acidity changes many times into whisky dry and spicy flavour with Aperol’s floral and orange notes. The last thing I want from this cocktail is to make it with original Ardbeg Renaissance. So the story doesn’t end.

You can comment this post

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *